All Posts in “Reading”

An Opportunity to Start Again

I’ve gone a year without practicing mindfulness. In the back of mind I felt that I’ve built up a mindfulness muscle, therefore, I should be able to coast for a short while. Before I knew it that short while became a year.

Something I say a lot, but yet, I myself wasn’t following is this:

Rising Strong by Brene Brown

Rising Strong by Brene Brown — Upon finishing a book, I’m giving myself a homework assignment to complete a book report. This allows me to consume the book from a different lens and mindset while forcing myself to reflect on what I’ve just read as a whole. 

Brene Brown seems to write exactly what I’m feeling in a way I can understand. They are a-ha moments of self-discovery. The underlining truth to all of this is that it’s pretty simple, but yet the most difficult as we are our biggest obstacle.

I feel the words written between the covers of Rising Strong are all the things that we as humans fundamentally know, but at the same time we don’t because of the masks and facades we create to cover them.

At a certain point in our lives we seem to disconnect from this truth. The truth of who we are. The truth of our stories, the falls, the laying face down in the arena while everyone watches.

Sometimes Your Worst Times Become Your Best Times

This is a guest post originally published on The Change Blog.

Even your worst times have value and can become, in retrospect, your best times. —Andy Andrews, The Noticer

I remember a year ago, the pounding, the darkness, the pain that I was feeling. I felt like I was about to rupture. I had it all locked up tight within me, the feelings, the stubbornness, pride, ego, humility; my truth.

I got to a point when it felt like my heart was beating and pumping outside of my chest. The stress and anxiety were taking a toll on me physically, all stemming from my emotional baggage.

The Answer to the Riddle is Me

In the chaos of this world, where we carom and collide in the everyday turbulence, there’s something about the specific gravity of the helpless individual, the lost and the fractured, that draws kindness from us, like venom from a wound. — David Stuart MacLean

I heard David read his essay on This American Life while walking my dog in the frigid cold one winter night. When I got home I immediately ordered the book.

On October 17, 2002, David MacLean “woke up” on a train platform in India with no idea who he was or why he was there. No money. No passport. No identity.

His story was fascinating.